Here’s How to Go on a Safari Without Leaving Atlanta This Summer

Passengers can enjoy food options like an asparagus cheddar frittata or a garlic marinated sirloin sandwich.

Alaska Airlines started bringing back hot and fresh food on long-haul flights this week, the airline shared with Travel + Leisure, representing yet another step closer to post pandemic-era travel.

The airline will now serve its full hot meal service in first class on transcontinental flights and trips to Hawaii (think: dishes like miso-marinated cod), along with giving passengers the option of ordering a fruit and cheese platter. To keep things as safe as possible, Alaska Airlines will serve the meal on a single tray to limit contact between passengers and flight attendants.

Guests in first class who are traveling on long haul non-transcontinental flights will be offered fresh meal boxes like an asparagus Tillamook cheddar frittata or a garlic marinated sirloin sandwich. Passengers can wash it all down with a drink served at 30,000 feet from local breweries like Seattle-based Fremont Brewing and wineries like California’s Broken Earth Winery.

Passengers in the main cabin will be able to purchase Mediterranean tapas boxes and Kids Picnic Packs, and can order fresh meals like a ham and egg breakfast wrap or harvest smoked turkey sandwich for flights over 1,100 miles.

“We’re excited to welcome our guests back on board and want them to have a great experience with us,” Todd Traynor-Corey, managing director of guest products at Alaska Airlines, said in a statement provided to T+L. “We’ve put a lot of thought and planning into safely increasing additional food and beverage service on our flights, while getting back to fresh and local menu items that our guests love.”

The decision to bring back more food and beverage options was made after partnering with epidemiologists, according to the airline.

The move represents another step toward getting back to normal. Airlines have increasingly abandoned pandemic-era protocols like blocking the middle seat or boarding panes back-to-front as more and more passengers take to the skies.

However, one coronavirus-influenced policy isn’t going anywhere anytime soon: Last month, the Transportation Security Administration extended its mask mandate until at least September.

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