Here’s How to Go on aJapan Opens Mass Vaccination Centers Ahead of Summer Olympics Safari Without Leaving Atlanta This Summer

Japan Opens Mass Vaccination Centers Ahead of Summer Olympics

Passengers can enjoy food options like an asparagus cheddar frittata or a garlic marinated sirloin sandwich.

Alaska Airlines started bringing back hot and fresh food on long-haul flights this week, the airline shared with Travel + Leisure, representing yet another step closer to post pandemic-era travel.

The airline will now serve its full hot meal service in first class on transcontinental flights and trips to Hawaii (think: dishes like miso-marinated cod), along with giving passengers the option of ordering a fruit and cheese platter. To keep things as safe as possible, Alaska Airlines will serve the meal on a single tray to limit contact between passengers and flight attendants.

Guests in first class who are traveling on long haul non-transcontinental flights will be offered fresh meal boxes like an asparagus Tillamook cheddar frittata or a garlic marinated sirloin sandwich. Passengers can wash it all down with a drink served at 30,000 feet from local breweries like Seattle-based Fremont Brewing and wineries like California’s Broken Earth Winery.

Passengers in the main cabin will be able to purchase Mediterranean tapas boxes and Kids Picnic Packs, and can order fresh meals like a ham and egg breakfast wrap or harvest smoked turkey sandwich for flights over 1,100 miles.

“We’re excited to welcome our guests back on board and want them to have a great experience with us,” Todd Traynor-Corey, managing director of guest products at Alaska Airlines, said in a statement provided to T+L. “We’ve put a lot of thought and planning into safely increasing additional food and beverage service on our flights, while getting back to fresh and local menu items that our guests love.”

The decision to bring back more food and beverage options was made after partnering with epidemiologists, according to the airline.

The move represents another step toward getting back to normal. Airlines have increasingly abandoned pandemic-era protocols like blocking the middle seat or boarding panes back-to-front as more and more passengers take to the skies.

However, one coronavirus-influenced policy isn’t going anywhere anytime soon: Last month, the Transportation Security Administration extended its mask mandate until at least September.

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Tokyo Enacts a Full State of Emergency Against COVID-19 Ahead of Olympics

Tokyo Enacts a Full State of Emergency Against COVID-19 Ahead of Olympics

The new 17-day emergency will begin Sunday and last until May 11.

Just three months before the scheduled start of the Tokyo Olympics, the Japanese capital has been placed under a state of emergency due to a growing wave of COVID-19 cases.

 

The new 17-day emergency will begin Sunday and last until May 11, which is the end of Japan’s “Golden Week” holidays, a time of year that typically involves travel, according to The Associated Press. It affects Tokyo and the metropolitan prefectures of Osaka, Kyoto, and Hyogo.

 

Earlier this month, Japan enacted a state of “quasi-emergency” in Tokyo, however, this new declaration will toughen those rules allowing prefectural governors to order businesses to close (with daily compensation) and fine those who violate the rules.

 

Department stores, malls, bars, restaurants with alcohol, theme parks, theatres and museums will close. Restaurants that do not serve alcohol and public transportation will close early. Grocery stores and schools will remain open, but universities have been asked to move their classes online.

 

Over the past few weeks, Japan has been fighting a third wave of rising cases. The country has reported a total of about 550,000 cases and less than 10,000 deaths. Although Japan has reported far fewer COVID-19 cases than western countries, the country is on high alert ahead of the Tokyo Olympics.

 

Critics of the state of emergency in Japan say that it is not long enough and privileges the Olympics schedule over the health of Japanese citizens. The state of emergency is scheduled to end before International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach visited Hiroshima on May 17.

 

However, Bach has said that the declaration “is absolutely in line with the overall policy of the government. But it is not related to the Olympic Games. It is related to the golden week,” The AP reported.

 

More than 15,000 athletes are slated to descend upon Tokyo ahead of the start of the Olympics on July 23. Spectators from abroad have been banned from the games this year.

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Tokyo Enacts ‘Quasi-emergency’ Order to Curb COVID-19 Spread Ahead of Olympics

Tokyo Enacts 'Quasi-emergency' Order to Curb COVID-19 Spread Ahead of Olympics

Tokyo is under a month-long state of “quasi-emergency” ahead of the Summer Olympics as COVID-19 cases continue to rise throughout the country.

The restrictions go into effect on Monday, April 12 for the prefectures of Tokyo, Okinawa, and Kyoto, Reuters reported.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has urged against all nonessential travel to and from the targeted regions, although there are no repercussions for those who do not comply.

“We’re extremely alarmed by the situation,” Yasutoshi Nishimura, the minister in charge of the government’s coronavirus response, told The Japan Times. “Although the measures target only specific areas, we’re going to implement very strong measures to contain the virus from spreading within them, as infections are rapidly becoming rampant.”

Although Tokyo has not yet announced its specific restrictions, the governor could enact curfews for bars and restaurants. Those who do not comply will be subject to a fine while those who do follow the suggestions will be given financial compensation.

Unlike a full state of emergency, these rules do not give prefecture governors the ability to order the closure of businesses.

The Tokyo area — made up of 23 central wards and six cities — will remain in its state of quasi-emergency until at least May 11. Kyoto and Okinawa will remain under the rules until May 5. The restrictions will run through Japan’s “Golden Week” holiday season from April 29 through May 5.

Tokyo reported 555 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, the highest number reported since early February. Japan has now counted more than 490,000 coronavirus cases in total and more than 9,300 deaths, according to Reuters.

Although Japan has reported far fewer COVID-19 cases than western countries, the country is on high alert ahead of the Tokyo Olympics. Earlier this week, Osaka declared a state of emergency and moved its portion of the Olympic Torch Relay into a private park, away from spectators.

More than 15,000 athletes are slated to descend upon Tokyo ahead of the start of the Olympics on July 23. Spectators from abroad have been banned from the games this year.

Cailey Rizzo is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure, currently based in Brooklyn. You can find her on Twitter, Instagram, or at caileyrizzo.com.

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