Eagle Beach

Eagle Beach Aruba, Caribbean

Eagle Beach

Fronting a line of low-rise resorts just northwest of Oranjestad, Eagle is a long stretch of white sand that regularly makes lists of the best beaches in the world. There are shade trees in some areas and you can obtain every service you need, from a lounger to a cold drink.

Eagle Beach is a leatherback-turtle nesting area, so parts of it may be closed from March to July.

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Cheapest Places to Travel

Cheapest Places toTravel in the World

Cheapest Places toTravel in the World

Traveling on a budget doesn’t mean sacrificing exciting experiences. Several destinations around the world offer affordable travel options without compromising on fun and adventure. Here are some of the cheapest places to travel in the world:

  1. Vietnam: From the bustling streets of Hanoi to the serene landscapes of Ha Long Bay, Vietnam offers a rich cultural experience at a fraction of the cost compared to many other Asian destinations.

  2. Cambodia: Home to the magnificent Angkor Wat temple complex, Cambodia boasts affordable accommodations, delicious street food, and a welcoming atmosphere.

  3. Bolivia: This South American gem offers stunning landscapes, including the otherworldly Salar de Uyuni salt flats. Prices for food, transportation, and accommodations are relatively low.

  4. Indonesia: With its beautiful beaches, lush jungles, and vibrant culture, Indonesia is a budget traveler’s paradise. Bali, Lombok, and the Gili Islands are popular destinations.

  5. India: India is known for its diverse culture, historical sites, and delicious cuisine. Traveling within the country is affordable, making it an ideal destination for budget-conscious travelers.

  6. Nepal: A haven for trekkers and adventure seekers, Nepal offers breathtaking mountain views and a range of affordable activities.

  7. Bulgaria: Eastern Europe provides an opportunity to explore charming cities like Sofia and Plovdiv without breaking the bank. Bulgaria offers affordable food, accommodations, and sightseeing options.

  8. Thailand: While some areas in Thailand can be expensive, overall, it is a budget-friendly destination with affordable street food, accommodations, and transportation.

  9. Morocco: Morocco offers a fascinating blend of cultures and landscapes, with affordable markets, accommodation options, and local experiences.

  10. Nicaragua: This Central American destination offers beautiful beaches, colonial cities, and diverse nature at relatively low prices.

  11. Portugal: Portugal provides an affordable European experience with stunning coastlines, historic cities, and delicious cuisine.

  12. Egypt: Discover ancient history and explore iconic landmarks like the Pyramids of Giza at affordable prices in Egypt.

Remember that even in affordable destinations, your travel budget will depend on factors like your travel style, activities, and accommodation choices. By researching and planning ahead, you can enjoy incredible adventures and cultural experiences while staying within your budget. Additionally, consider traveling during the off-peak season or taking advantage of deals and discounts to stretch your travel funds even further.

 

Bondi Beach

Bondi Beach

The Museum of Pop Culture (formerly EMP, the “Experience Music Project”) is an inspired marriage between super-modern architecture and legendary rock-and-roll history that sprang from the imagination (and pocket) of Microsoft co-creator Paul Allen (1953–2018). Inside its avant-garde frame, you can tune into the famous sounds of Seattle (with an obvious bias toward Jimi Hendrix and grunge) or attempt to imitate the masters in the Interactive Sound Lab.

There’s a science fiction and fantasy exhibit on-site, as well as various temporary exhibits.

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Museum of Pop Culture

Museum of Pop Culture

The Museum of Pop Culture (formerly EMP, the “Experience Music Project”) is an inspired marriage between super-modern architecture and legendary rock-and-roll history that sprang from the imagination (and pocket) of Microsoft co-creator Paul Allen (1953–2018). Inside its avant-garde frame, you can tune into the famous sounds of Seattle (with an obvious bias toward Jimi Hendrix and grunge) or attempt to imitate the masters in the Interactive Sound Lab.

There’s a science fiction and fantasy exhibit on-site, as well as various temporary exhibits.

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Discovery Park

Discovery Park

Hard to beat on a sunny spring day, this former military installation has been transformed into a wild coastal park, laced with walking trails and offering glimpses of the Olympic Mountains across the water. It’s the largest green space in the Seattle, with 534 acres of forest, meadows, sand dunes and beaches, providing a welcome escape for locals and a vital corridor for wildlife.

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La Paz Waterfall Gardens

La Paz Waterfall Gardens

La Paz Waterfall Gardens

This polished storybook garden complex just east of Volcán Poás offers the most easily digestible cultural experience in the Central Valley and is the largest animal sanctuary in Costa Rica. Set aside at least two hours to experience the gardens, but you could easily spend an entire day exploring the natural wonders on offer. Guided tours are available to book and there are several bars and restaurants available on site for when you’ve grown tired of feeding the birds and want to indulge yourself.

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Cades Cove

Cades Cove

Top choice in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Cades Cove, Tennessee

In Appalachian parlance, a cove means a valley, but Cades Cove is far more than that. One of the most popular destinations in the Tennessee section of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, many consider this 6800-acre valley to be a national treasure due to its poignant cultural legacy, pioneer architecture and plentiful wildlife.

Cades Cove has more than two million visitors a year because of its historic homesteads, waterfalls and scenic viewpoints all within a verdant landscape of lush green fields enveloped by an unbroken expanse of mountains. It offers some of the best opportunities for wildlife viewing in the wider National Park, and whether blanketed in bright wildflowers in the spring or vivid colors in the fall, its scenery never disappoints.

History of Cades Cove, Tennessee

For hundreds of years, the Cherokee used Cades Cove as a hunting settlement and the valley is named after their local leader, Chief Kade. European settlers – most of them English, Scots-Irish and Welsh – arrived in the 1820s. By 1850, the valley’s population had swelled to 70 households and 451 residents, later reaching a peak of 708. The national park was chartered by the US Congress in 1934, and officially dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1940.

Today, thanks to the excellent preservation efforts of the National Park Service, you can still get a vivid sense of life in Cades Cove during the 19th century. Scattered along the loop road are three churches, a working grist mill, barns, pioneer log cabins and many other faithfully restored structures.

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Popular National Park

Cades Cove is the most popular area in the USA’s most popular national park, so go early if you want to beat the crowds. An 11-mile, one-way loop road circles the cove, offering motorists the opportunity to sightsee at a leisurely pace. It is possible to stop at pullouts to enjoy the scenery or view wildlife. Be aware that because of bumper-to-bumper traffic during peak season, it can take five hours to drive the road – longer than it would take to walk.

There is only one driving entrance into the Cades Cove Loop from Laurel Creek Road. Although you may see many online maps that may appear to show multiple entrances, this is the only one leading directly into the loop. The road is open to car traffic from dawn to dusk, except on Wednesdays and Saturdays from early May through late September, when bicycles and hikers rule the road until 10am.

Entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park is free. Allow at least two to four hours to tour Cades Cove, and longer if you walk some of the area’s trails. The best wildlife viewing occurs in the very early morning and late afternoon. Pick up the self-guiding Cades Cove Tour booklet ($1) from any visitor center to discover more about Cades Cove’s attractions and history. Day Hikes In & Around Cades Cove is available for a minimal fee.

Waterfalls at Cades Cove

Waterfalls are a huge attraction of Cades Cove and Abrams Falls is one of the most popular falls. The hiking trail to Abrams Falls is located past the #10 stop on Cades Cove Loop Road, and it takes around three to four hours to hike there and back. It’s worth it for the picturesque waterfall, which is located on Abrams Creek. Although it’s only 20-feet high, a large volume of water rushes over the edge into a long, deep pool at its base.

Laurel Falls is another popular waterfall and it is located along the Laurel Falls Trail. It is 80-feet tall and it takes around two hours to hike there and back. Then there’s the Lynn Camp Prong cascades, which can be viewed while hiking the Middle Prong Trail. Tackling this trail means taking a 1.6-mile round trip and is suitable for hikers of all abilities.

 

What to do at Cades Cove

Numerous hiking trails originate in the cove, including the trail to Abrams Falls and the short Cades Cove Nature Trail. Longer hikes to Thunderhead Mountain and Rocky Top also begin here, and a park trail map can be downloaded from the National Park Service.

Wildlife in the park include white-tailed deer, black bears, coyotes, groundhogs, turkeys, raccoons and skunks. A nearby horse stable provides one-hour horseback rides as well as hay rides and carriage rides from March through October. Cades Cove Visitor Center is located half-way around the loop road in the Cable Mill historic area, and it has restrooms and a bookstore.

Camping is a very popular activity and there are several located within the national park. Cades Cove Campground is open year round, and it has 159 sites and can accommodate tents and RVs up to 35 feet. Call (877) 444-6777 or visit here to reserve a site.

 


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Gold Souq

Gold Souq

Gold Souq

All that glitters is gold (and occasionally silver) along this covered arcade where dozens of shops overflow with every kind of jewelry imaginable, from delicate pearl earrings to lavish golden wedding necklaces. Simply watching the goings-on is a treat. Settle down on a bench and take in the lively street theater of hard-working Afghan men dragging heavy carts of goods, African women in colorful kaftans and local women out on a shopping spree. The best time to visit is in the bustling evenings. Mornings are busy with tour groups, and the afternoons are sleepy.

Gold has been big business in Dubai since the 1940s. Today, the emirate is one of the world’s largest gold markets, accounting for roughly 25% of the global trade.

Central Arcade
Dozens of jewelry shops spilling over with gold, diamonds, pearls, silver and platinum line the souq’s car-free, wooden-latticed central axis. From stud earrings to intricate wedding necklaces, it’s a dazzling display and a must-see, even if you’re not part of the bling brigade. Most shops are run by Indian merchants, while customers are mostly Indian or Arab, which helps explain the deep yellow tint of the gold and the often extremely elaborate designs, as is preferred in those parts of the world.

Record-breaking gold ring
Dubai being the capital of superlatives, the Gold Souq is naturally home to a record-breaking piece of jewelry. Stop at Kanz Jewellers just past the main souq entrance (off Old Baladiya St) to snap a selfie with the world’s largest and heaviest gold ring, as certified by Guinness World Records. Called the Najmat Taiba (Star of Taiba), the 21-karat beauty weighs in at nearly 140 pounds (64kg) and is studded with 11 pounds (5.1kg) of diamonds and precious stones. It is worth a hefty US$3 million.

What to look for when buying at Dubai’s Gold Souq
There’s no need to worry about fakes at the Gold Souq (unless you’re in the market for a knock-off Rolex watch or Prada bag from one of the touts trying to tempt you). The quality of gold is regulated by the Dubai government, so you can be fairly confident that the piece of jewelry you’ve got your eye on is genuine.

Price is determined by two factors: weight based on the official daily international rate and the artistry of the item. The latest gold rates are posted throughout the souq and online. Most pieces for sale here are 14 or 18 karat. If you don’t see anything you like, don’t panic. Most shops will make something to your own design.

Haggling is expected, and vendors build in price buffers accordingly. Since the price of gold itself is fixed, focus on the intricacy of the artisanship as a point of discussion. Buying more than one item should also net you a discount, as does paying in cash, though credit cards are almost always accepted. Sharp bargaining skills usually make merchants drop the initial asking price by 20% to 30%. Don’t rush! Remember, you don’t have to make a decision on the spot. Compare carefully before you buy and be prepared to haggle.

Where to stay near the Gold Souq
Dubai’s Gold Souq is in the Deira neighborhood, which is close to the airport and therefore popular with visitors on stopovers. There are plenty of older, smaller, budget places in and around the souqs, although some can be quite – how shall we say? – shady. Nicer properties can be found along the Creek as far south as Dubai Festival City.

Where to eat near the Gold Souq
A classic pit stop in this area is Ashwaq Cafeteria, whose shawarma rocks the palate. Wash it down with a freshly squeezed fruit juice.

How to get to the Gold Souq
Take the Dubai Metro to Al Ras, or ride an abra (a traditional boat) to Deira Old Souk abra station.

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St Mary Lake

St Mary Lake

St Mary Lake

Located on the park’s dryer eastern side, where the mountains melt imperceptibly into the Great Plains, St Mary Lake lies in a deep, glacier-carved valley famous for its astounding views and ferocious winds. Overlooked by the tall, chiseled peaks of the Rockies and with the northern slopes dramatically thinned from the lake shore to Going-to-the-Sun Rd by the 2015 Reynolds Creek fire, the valley views are still spectacular and punctuated by numerous trailheads and viewpoints.

St Mary’s gorgeous turquoise sheen, easily the most striking color of any of Glacier’s major bodies of water, is due to the suspension of tiny particles of glacial rock in the lake’s water that absorbs and reflects light.

The landscape-altering effects of the 2006 Red Eagle Fire is still very much visible on the southern slopes of the lake.

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